eConsult

In February 2024, we “soft launched” our e-Consult system. This system allows patients to contact the surgery in a new way, ask questions, submit information or seek appointments through a high quality, convenient, safe and reliable online platform available on the practice website. Whilst at present, many patients are still making appointments by telephoning the practice, we have been having adding to this capacity by having the ability for patients to complete the online consultation templates on our practice website.

We have a dedicated daily triage team of Doctors and other members of the team then looking at these and are endeavouring to respond as soon as possible, with the end of the next working day as the absolute deadline. The early data has been extremely promising.

For more information about how to use the platform, please see our FAQ’s and guides here

Some common winter ailments, and self care

Advice about common winter illnesses, such as a cough, the common cold, sore throat etc., antibiotic use and how you can help your symptoms at home:

See the link below, or take a look at the posters.

Winter illness | NHS inform

2023 Flu and Covid vaccines available now | Dunrobin Street Medical Centre

Our surgery now has Flu and Covid vaccines for anyone over the age of 65. Other eligible groups are listed below.

We have over 2000 jabs available and appointment slots are being booked as I type this message!

 

How to book your Flu and Covid vaccine

When am I most at risk from flu and Covid?

Flu circulates every winter. This means many people get ill around the same time. In a bad year, this can be an epidemic. However, it is impossible to predict how many cases of flu there will be each year. This year is predicted to be a bad year after low circulation of flu the past three years. Covid has also been noted to be on the rise again with several confirmed cases being reported again. the new variant means that everyone is at a heightened risk again.

Does everyone need a flu jab?

No, just people who are at particular risk of problems if they catch flu. Ask your GP about having an NHS flu vaccination if:

  • you’re aged 65 or over
  • you’re pregnant
  • you have a serious medical condition
  • you live in a residential or nursing home
  • you’re the main carer for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • your child is in an at-risk group and is aged six months to two years Some pharmacies also offer free NHS flu vaccination to eligible adults. They do not offer this service for children.
  • You should also be offered the flu vaccination if you are a healthcare or social care worker directly involved in patient care.

Find out more about who should have the flu vaccine.

What about Covid vaccinations? Am I eligible?

Specifically, JCVI advises the following groups be offered a COVID-19 booster vaccine this autumn:

  • residents in a care home for older adults
  • all adults aged 65 years and over
  • persons aged 6 months to 64 years in a clinical risk group, as laid out in the Immunisation Green Book, COVID-19 chapter (Green Book)
  • frontline health and social care workers
  • persons aged 12 to 64 years who are household contacts (as defined in the Green Book) of people with immunosuppression
  • persons aged 16 to 64 years who are carers (as defined in the Green Book) and staff working in care homes for older adults

Find out about who should have the covid vaccine

Whilst the categories seem very similar, there are slight differences and your GP surgeries can tell you if you are eligible for both, one or none. 

Why are certain groups targeted for the flu and covid jabs?

Complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia are more common in people with other diseases, especially if they are also elderly. Almost all of the deaths related to flu and covid are in people in these groups.

In long-stay residential homes, vaccination helps prevent the rapid spread of flu and covid among residents.

Can a GP vaccinate anyone else?

The final decision about who should be offered the vaccination on the NHS is a matter for your GP, based on your medical history and circumstances.

Is it safe to have both vaccines at the same time?

Yes! We have amazing bodies and our immune system can respond independently to both vaccines giving a strong response to both. If you are not sure about having both at the same time, let the nurse or doctor know and we will book you in for your other in the near future.

How long will the flu and covid jab protect me for?

The flu and covid jab will provide protection for you for the upcoming flu and covid season. People eligible for flu vaccination should have the vaccine each year.

Can I have the flu jab while I’m taking antibiotics?

Yes, it’s fine to have the flu and covid jabs while you are taking a course of antibiotics, provided you are not ill with a fever.

How long do the vaccines take to become effective?

It takes between 10 and 14 days for your immune system to respond fully after you’ve had the jabs.

If I had the flu and covid jab last year/earlier this year, do I need it again now?

Yes. The viruses that cause flu can change every year, which means the flu (and the vaccine) this winter may be different from last winter. New covid variants are emerging and circulating quickly too.

When is the best time to get my jabs?

The best time to have a flu vaccine is in the autumn, from the beginning of October to early November. But don’t worry if you’ve missed this time, you can have the flu jab later in the winter although it’s best to get it as early as possible. The new covid variant is circulating already and NHs england have accelerated the roll out of the vaccine into September. 

Is there anyone who cannot have a flu or covid jab?

Yes. You should not have the flu or covid vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu or covid vaccine respectively, or one of its ingredients. This happens very rarely. You also need to take precautions if you have an egg allergy.

Read more about who should not have the flu jab.

Can I get the flu vaccine privately?

People who aren’t eligible for a flu jab on the NHS can pay for a flu vaccination privately. The flu vaccine may be available from pharmacies or in supermarkets. It is provided on a private patient basis and you have to pay. The vaccine costs up to £20.

Why is it recommended that healthcare workers are vaccinated?

Vaccination prevents healthcare workers passing flu or covid on to, or getting flu or covid from, their patients. It also helps the NHS to keep running effectively during a flu or covid outbreak, when GPs and hospital services are particularly busy.

Can I have a flu or covid jab if I’m breastfeeding?

Yes. The vaccine poses no risk to a breastfeeding mother or her baby, or to pregnant women.

Is it OK to have the flu and covid vaccine during pregnancy?

Yes. The flu and covid vaccines are recommended for pregnant women and is safe to have at any stage of pregnancy, including in the first trimester and right up to the expected due date. It helps protect the mother-to-be and her newborn baby from catching flu.

Find out more about the COVID vaccine here

Find out more about the Flu vaccine here

SPLat-19 Research Study

You can also contact the practice to learn more on 01782 590040.

Influenza Vaccination for 50+

Our surgery now has flu vaccines for anyone over the age of 50.

We have over 1500 jabs available and appointment slots are being booked as I type this message!

 

How to book your Flu vaccine

 

When am I most at risk from flu?

Flu circulates every winter. This means many people get ill around the same time. In a bad year, this can be an epidemic. However, it is impossible to predict how many cases of flu there will be each year. This year is predicted to be a bad year after low circulation of flu the past two years.

Does everyone need a flu jab?

No, just people who are at particular risk of problems if they catch flu. Ask your GP about having an NHS flu vaccination if:

  • you’re aged 50 or over
  • you’re pregnant
  • you have a serious medical condition
  • you live in a residential or nursing home
  • you’re the main carer for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • your child is in an at-risk group and is aged six months to two years Some pharmacies also offer free NHS flu vaccination to eligible adults. They do not offer this service for children.
  • Find out more about who should have the flu vaccine.
  • You should also be offered the flu vaccination if you are a healthcare or social care worker directly involved in patient care.

Find out more about who should have the flu vaccine.

Why are certain groups targeted for the flu jab?

Complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia are more common in people with other diseases, especially if they are also elderly. Almost all of the deaths related to flu are in people in these groups.

In long-stay residential homes, vaccination helps prevent the rapid spread of flu among residents.

Can a GP vaccinate anyone else?

The final decision about who should be offered the vaccination on the NHS is a matter for your GP, based on your medical history and circumstances.

Is my child entitled to the flu jab?

If your child is aged between six months and two years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they should have the flu jab.

If your child is between two and 17 years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they should have the nasal spray flu vaccine instead of the injection.

Children aged two and three plus children in reception class and school years one, two, three and four are also eligible for the nasal spray flu vaccine.

How long will the flu jab protect me for?

The flu jab will provide protection f

for you for the upcoming flu season. People eligible for flu vaccination should have the vaccine each year.

Can I have the flu jab while I’m taking antibiotics?

Yes, it’s fine to have the flu jab while you are taking a course of antibiotics, provided you are not ill with a fever.

How long does the flu vaccine take to become effective?

It takes between 10 and 14 days for your immune system to respond fully after you’ve had the flu jab.

If I had the flu jab last year, do I need it again now?

Yes. The viruses that cause flu can change every year, which means the flu (and the vaccine) this winter may be different from last winter.

Can the flu jab cause flu?

No. The vaccine does not contain any live viruses, so it cannot cause flu. You may get a slight temperature and aching muscles for a couple of days afterwards, and your arm may feel a bit sore where you had the injection. Other reactions are rare, and flu jabs have a good safety record.

When is the best time to get my flu jab?

The best time to have a flu vaccine is in the autumn, from the beginning of October to early November. But don’t worry if you’ve missed this time, you can have the flu jab later in the winter although it’s best to get it as early as possible.

Is there anyone who cannot have a flu jab?

Yes. You should not have the flu vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu vaccine or one of its ingredients. This happens very rarely. You also need to take precautions if you have an egg allergy.

Read more about who should not have the flu jab.

Can I get the flu vaccine privately?

People who aren’t eligible for a flu jab on the NHS can pay for a flu vaccination privately. The flu vaccine may be available from pharmacies or in supermarkets. It is provided on a private patient basis and you have to pay. The vaccine costs up to £20.

Why is it recommended that healthcare workers are vaccinated?

Vaccination prevents healthcare workers passing flu on to, or getting flu from, their patients. It also helps the NHS to keep running effectively during a flu outbreak, when GPs and hospital services are particularly busy.

Can I have a flu jab if I’m breastfeeding?

Yes. The vaccine poses no risk to a breastfeeding mother or her baby, or to pregnant women.

Is it OK to have the flu vaccine during pregnancy?

Yes. The flu vaccine is recommended for pregnant women and is safe to have at any stage of pregnancy, including in the first trimester and right up to the expected due date. It helps protect the mother-to-be and her newborn baby from catching flu.

Read more about the flu jab in pregnancy.

How do I get the flu vaccine if my GP has run out?

If your GP has run out of flu vaccine, vaccine manufacturers and suppliers may have stocks available for ordering.

Some local pharmacies offer a free flu vaccination service to NHS patients who are eligible for flu vaccination. This service is only available for adults, however, not children.

 

Flu Vaccination Patient Information Leaflet

Men’s Health Week – Fathers Day

This week is Men’s Health Week

Men’s Health Week always begins on the Monday before Father’s Day and ends on Father’s Day itself.  During 2022, it will run from Monday 13th until Sunday 19th June.

The overall aims of the week are to:

  1. Engage males in their own healthcare
  2. Heighten awareness of preventable health problems for males of all ages.
  3. Support men and boys to engage in healthier lifestyle choices / activities.
  4. Encourage the early detection and treatment of health difficulties in males.

As it tries to respond to under-diagnosis during the pandemic, the NHS is moving into a particularly difficult period. To meet the challenge, we need, more than ever, a gender-aware approach. A women’s health strategy is rightly promised by government. But what about men?

We found this DIY MOT on your health here –> DIY Man MOT | Men’s Health Forum (menshealthforum.org.uk)

Find out more information by visiting https://www.menshealthforum.org.uk/mhw

This week is Mental Health Awareness week

Dunrobin Street Medical Centre is celebrating Mental Health Awareness Week.

 This year the theme is Loneliness which affects millions of people across the UK.

Monday 9 May 2021: Today marks the launch of Mental Health Awareness Week, the UK’s national week to raise awareness of mental health.  

The week, which is hosted by the Mental Health Foundation, is in its 22nd year and runs from 9-15 May.

This year, the theme for the week is ‘Loneliness’. Across the country, people will be reflecting on loneliness and how it impacts our mental health. Long-term loneliness is closely linked to mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Come and speak to a qualified professional at Dunrobin Street Medical Centre.

Mark Rowland Chief Executive of the Mental Health Foundation said:

“We hope this year’s theme of loneliness will strike a chord with many of us who felt lonely and struggled throughout the Covid pandemic. 

“Millions of us experience loneliness from time to time. We know that some people are at higher risk of experiencing loneliness and the evidence shows the longer we feel lonely, the more we are at risk of mental health problems.

“Loneliness deserves more attention and we’re calling on everyone who has struggled as a result of being lonely to share their experiences. We must work together – as individuals, as a society and through government policy – to reduce loneliness and prevent mental health problems by investing in welcoming, social spaces and new community initiatives.”

Call our surgery on 01782 590040 to book an appointment.

Extended Primary Care Services

The NHS General Practice Forward View (GPFV) outlines a five-year plan to sustain and transform general practice. One of the national requirements it includes is for Enhanced access primary care services to be available to all patients for both pre-bookable and same day appointments from 1 September 2018.

Under Enhanced access Primary Care Services programme, there is a requirement for patients to be able to access 1½ hours additional appointments after 6.30pm each week day and an effective weekend service based on the local needs of the area. All practices must be able to direct patients to the service and offer a choice of evening or weekend appointments on an equal footing to core hours appointments.

To deliver extended access primary care services that are equitable to all patients and sustainable, practices and GP federations are working collaboratively. This could mean that patients will be required to visit a nearby practice other than their own GP surgery. The clinicians delivering care to patients, even those registered with another practice, will be able to view the medical records of patients to ensure effective clinical care.

As part of the scheme, practices are coming together to transform the way primary care services are delivered over the next three years. Practices are continuing to develop their current workforce models so that patients are directed to the most appropriate healthcare professional to meet their needs at their first appointment. This is not always a GP and so practices are working towards involving other primary care professionals as part of the model. The additional capacity will also mean more time can be spent in practices to provide longer appointment for patients with more complex needs, such as frail and elderly people.

The Enhanced access Service aims to respond to the needs of the local population in each area and respond to the feedback we received from our engagement with patients and the public. Your local GP surgery will be able to advise you on the arrangements for your own practice. To book an appointment, patients simply need to contact their own GP surgery.

GDPR

GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION
Your personal and health information is really important. So we are making some changes to how we collect and use that data. They reflect the rights and protection you are entitled to under the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This come into effect on 25th May 2018.
Our privacy notice and how we use your information document, explains what information we hold about you, how and why we use that information, how we retain and secure this information, who we share this information with and for what purposes.
Please click on the links below, these documents can also be found in surgery;

ANTIOBIOTIC GUARDIAN

Here at Dunrobin Street Medical Centre we are Antibiotic Guardians.
Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats facing us today.
Why it is relevant to you: without effective antibiotics many routine treatments will become increasingly dangerous. Setting broken bones, basic operations, even chemotherapy and animal health all rely on access to antibiotics that work.
What we want you to do: To slow resistance we need to cut the unnecessary use of antibiotics. We invite the public, students and educators, farmers, the veterinary and medical communities and professional organisations, to become Antibiotic Guardians.
Call to action: Choose one simple pledge about how you’ll make better use of antibiotics and help save these vital medicines from becoming obsolete.

For more information please click on the hyperlink below:

ANTIOBIOTIC